Dance News Feedhttp://dance.wisc.edu/This is the News RSS Feed for the Dance Department in the School of Education at the University of Wisconsin - Madison.urn:uuid:25f5c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/02/28/milwaukee-public-radio-profiles-uw-madison-alum-stanford-taylor Milwaukee public radio profiles UW-Madison alum Stanford TaylorMilwaukee’s public radio, WUWM 89.7-FM, recently profiled UW-Madison alumna Carolyn Stanford Taylor. Among many achievements in Stanford Taylor’s career, she is the first black woman to lead Wisconsin’s Department of Public Instruction. Stanford Taylor earned an undergraduate degree in elementary education in 1978 and a master's from the School of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis in 1979.Fri, 28 Feb 2020 10:03:00 Z<p>Milwaukee&rsquo;s public radio, WUWM 89.7-FM, recently profiled UW-Madison alumna Carolyn Stanford Taylor.</p> <p>Stanford Taylor earned an undergraduate degree in elementary education in 1978 and a master's from the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://elpa.education.wisc.edu/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis</a> in 1979.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/carolyn-stanford-taylor-250-px-sq.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Carolyn Stanford Taylor" displaymode="Original" title="carolyn-stanford-taylor 250 px SQ" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Stanford Taylor</figcaption> </figure> </div> Among many achievements in Stanford Taylor&rsquo;s career, she is the first black woman to lead Wisconsin&rsquo;s Department of Public Instruction. Appointed by Gov. Tony Evers, a fellow UW-Madison alum, in 2019, she previously served as the assistant state superintendent.</p> <p>But being "first" was never at the front of her mind, Stanford Taylor explains. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m passionate about the next generation and how we usher them to success,&rdquo; she tells WUWM. &ldquo;And so, if I can be a model of success for any student that might be struggling, then that&rsquo;s a bonus.&rdquo;</p> <p>Stanford Taylor&rsquo;s family was also one of the first to integrate schools in Marks, Mississippi, a segregated city. She cites the struggles that she and other students of color faced after integration as what influenced her to choose a path in education.</p> <p>&ldquo;Having had that experience and knowing that many of the students who didn&rsquo;t graduate were just as bright as I was, but because of that lack of support and advocacy, they did not get to become all they could be. Then that made me even more passionate about this work around education, and how education should be the great equalizer,&rdquo; Stanford Taylor tells WUWM.</p> <p>Check out the full WUWM report <a href="https://www.wuwm.com/post/black-women-firsts-wisconsin-dpi-superintendent-carolyn-stanford-taylor#stream/0" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>.</p>urn:uuid:15f5c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/02/27/uw-madison-s-turner-authors---suddenly-diverse--how-school-districts-manage-race-and-inequality UW-Madison's Turner authors, 'Suddenly Diverse: How School Districts Manage Race and Inequality'UW-Madison’s Erica Turner, an associate professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies, recently wrote a new book, titled “Suddenly Diverse: How School Districts Manage Race and Inequality.”Thu, 27 Feb 2020 11:32:00 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Erica Turner, an associate professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a title="EPS website" href="https://eps.education.wisc.edu/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Department of Educational Policy Studies</a>, recently wrote a new book, &ldquo;Suddenly Diverse: How School Districts Manage Race and Inequality.&rdquo;</p> <p>Turner&rsquo;s work notes that American public schools have been enrolling more students identified as black, Latinx, American Indian, and Asian than white students over the past five years. Additionally, more than half of U.S. students qualify for federally subsidized meals, a marker of poverty.</p> <p><img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/suddenly-diverse-350-px.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Suddenly Diverse book cover" title="Suddenly Diverse 350 px" class="FloatImageRight" />Indeed, the makeup of schools is changing quickly, and many districts and school boards are struggling with how best to effectively and equitably handle these shifts.</p> <p>A preview of the book explains how &ldquo;Suddenly Diverse&rdquo; is an ethnographic account of two school districts in the Midwest &mdash; one predominantly working class and conservative, while the other is more affluent and liberal &mdash; responding to these rapidly changing demographics at their schools.</p> <p>Turner's work is based on observations and in-depth interviews with school board members and superintendents, as well as staff, community members, and other stakeholders in each district.</p> <p>Turner finds that, despite good intentions from district leaders, they often adopted policies and practices that perpetuated existing inequalities and advanced forms of racism.</p> <p>Suggesting ways forward, Turner shows that changes need to be made. Without transformations to the system, she argues, even the best efforts of district members will undermine the promise of equity for students.</p> <p>Learn more about Turner's book <a title="Turner book info page" href="https://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/S/bo45713418.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>.</p>urn:uuid:ddf5c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/02/27/uw-madison-s-nachman-authors-study-examining-campus-climate-for-autistic-lgbtq-students UW-Madison's Nachman authors study examining campus climate for autistic LGBTQ studentsUW-Madison’s Brett Nachman, a doctoral candidate with the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, served as the lead author on a case study article exploring campus climates for autistic LGBTQ college students. The article, which Nachman wrote with Dr. Ryan A. Miller (UNC-Charlotte) and Dr. Edlyn Vallejo Peña (California Lutheran University), was published in the Journal of Cases in Educational Leadership.Thu, 27 Feb 2020 11:06:00 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Brett Nachman served as the lead author on a case study exploring campus climates for autistic lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) college students.</p> <p>Nachman is doctoral candidate with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a rel="noopener" target="_blank" href="https://elpa.education.wisc.edu/">Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis</a>.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img title="Nachman 250 px SQ" displaymode="Original" alt="Brett Nachman" src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/nachman-250-px-sq.jpg?sfvrsn=0" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Nachman </figcaption> </figure> </div> The article is titled " 'Whose Liability Is It Anyway?' Cultivating an Inclusive College Climate for Autistic LGBTQ Students. The report is co-authored with Dr. Ryan A. Miller (UNC-Charlotte) and Dr. Edlyn Vallejo Pe&ntilde;a (California Lutheran University), and was published in the Journal of Cases in Educational Leadership.</p> <p>According to their research, higher education institutes are experiencing increased enrollments of autistic students who are disproportionately more likely to identify as gay, lesbian, transgender, and/or genderqueer than their non-disabled peers.</p> <p>This case study follows the story of a student named Erik, an autistic student who identifies as gay and is considering coming out. Nachman and his fellow authors challenge readers to consider the role that educational leaders can play in addressing the complexities of supporting students like Erik.</p> <p>Nachman, Miller, and Vallejo are also concerned with the implications of addressing campus climate issues for students with multiple, intersecting identities.</p> <p>Access the article <a rel="noopener" target="_blank" href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1555458919897942">here</a>.</p>urn:uuid:2df5c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/02/26/uw-madison-s-ruppar-named-co-editor-of-new-journal--inclusive-practices UW-Madison's Ruppar named co-editor of new journal, Inclusive PracticesUW-Madison Andrea Ruppar was recently named an inaugural co-editor of a new research-to-practice journal called Inclusive Practices. Ruppar is an associate professor with the Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education.Wed, 26 Feb 2020 12:09:00 Z<p>UW-Madison Andrea Ruppar was recently named an inaugural co-editor of a new research-to-practice journal called Inclusive Practices.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/andrea-ruppar-250-px-sq.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Ruppar" displaymode="Original" title="Andrea Ruppar 250 px SQ" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Ruppar </figcaption> </figure> </div> Ruppar is an associate professor of special education with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://rpse.education.wisc.edu/" title="RPSE website" target="_blank">Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>The journal is published by Sage, and is a publication of TASH, an international leader in disability advocacy.</p> <p>Inclusive Practices is a research-to-practice journal focused on lifespan issues for individuals with significant support needs. With topic areas ranging from inclusive education to human rights, this journal will serve as a companion to the TASH flagship research journal, Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities.&nbsp;</p> <p>Jennifer Kurth of the University of Kansas will serve as the other co-editor.&nbsp;</p>urn:uuid:c7f3c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/02/25/mueller-to-receive-outstanding-dissertation-award-from-inclusive-education-research-sig Mueller to receive Outstanding Dissertation Award from Inclusive Education Research SIGCarlyn Mueller is receiving an Outstanding Dissertation Award from AERA's Special and Inclusive Education Research SIG. Her dissertation is titled, “Beyond Stigma: Disability Identity in School Contexts.” Mueller, whose research is informed by her personal experience as a disabled scholar, will be joining the School of Education prior to the fall 2020 semester as an assistant professor with the Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education.Tue, 25 Feb 2020 11:30:00 Z<p>Carlyn Mueller was recently selected to receive an Outstanding Dissertation Award from an American Educational Research Association (AERA) special interest group (SIG).</p> <p>She is being recognized by the Special and Inclusive Education Research SIG for her dissertation, &ldquo;Beyond Stigma: Disability Identity in School Contexts.&rdquo;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/carlyn-mueller.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Mueller" displaymode="Original" title="Carlyn Mueller" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Mueller</figcaption> </figure> </div> Mueller, whose research is informed by her personal experience as a disabled scholar, will be joining the School of Education prior to the fall 2020 semester as an assistant professor with the Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education.</p> <p>Mueller&rsquo;s critical qualitative study that&rsquo;s being honored focuses on understanding disability identity development in special education. She explains that this dissertation research was done through a two-phase design, including both adults and students with disabilities in life history interviews and a photovoice project.</p> <p>Mueller notes that common shared identity experiences of the participants included: a lack of discussion of disability in curriculum and from special and general educators; attempts to distance themselves from the stigma of disability labeling in school; and participation in disability community only in adulthood.</p> <p>Her study supports the need to develop schools and instructional spaces that intentionally develop positive disability identity, which would have far-reaching impact on the academic and social experiences of students with disabilities in school.</p> <p>Mueller conducted this research while earning a Ph.D. in special education from the University of Washington in Seattle in August 2019. She currently is an Academic Pathways Postdoctoral Fellow at the Vanderbilt University.</p> <p>Mueller will be recognized and briefly present her work during the Special and Inclusive Education SIG&rsquo;s annual meeting, which takes part during the 2020 AERA Annual Meeting in San Francisco, which runs April 17-21.</p>urn:uuid:0ff4c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/02/24/on-my-own--examines-the-difficult-paths-students-must-chart-through-community-college ‘On my Own’ examines the difficult paths students must chart through community collegeUW-Madison's Xueli Wang, a professor with our Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, is the author of a new book that is being called a "must-read primer for improving and diversifying STEM pathways." Wang's work is titled, “On My Own: The Challenge and Promise of Building Equitable STEM Transfer Pathways.”Mon, 24 Feb 2020 11:39:00 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Xueli Wang has spent much of her academic career examining ways to improve the higher education landscape in an effort to help college students find their path to a better life.</p> <p>Wang&rsquo;s research puts a particular emphasis on students who start out at two-year colleges with an eye on transferring to a four-year institution to earn a degree in a STEM (science, technology, engineering, or mathematics) field.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img title="Wang-Xueli SQ" displaymode="Original" alt="Xueli Wang" src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/wang-xueli-sq.jpg?sfvrsn=0" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Wang </figcaption> </figure> </div> &ldquo;There has been a lot of interest in expanding and diversifying STEM, and community and technical colleges are often portrayed as the engine to prepare STEM workers at the sub-baccalaureate level,&rdquo; says Wang, a professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. &ldquo;This narrative has troubled me as it leaves out a crucial function of many public, two-year institutions that enroll some of the most talented yet historically underserved students aspiring to transfer upward. These institutions and their transfer-aspiring students can no longer remain on the periphery of conversations of STEM bachelor&rsquo;s degree attainment.&rdquo;</p> <p>More than eight million students enroll at community colleges across the United States, with 75 to 80 percent intending to transfer and earn a bachelor&rsquo;s degree. Yet only about a quarter of those students actually transfer.</p> <p>The students who do transfer, however, are highly successful and experience similar outcomes compared with students starting directly at four-year institutions.</p> <p>But as Wang explains, the road to transfer is infiltrated with structural barriers. In addition, efforts to find new and more effective ways to support these highly motivated students on their academic journey weren&rsquo;t being studied in a systematic and longitudinal way to fully uncover the various complexities and nuances related to transfer.</p> <p>Until now.</p> <p>With more than a decade of research in this realm, Wang is publishing her first book: &ldquo;<a href="https://www.hepg.org/hep-home/books/on-my-own">On My Own: The Challenge and Promise of Building Equitable STEM Transfer Pathways</a>,&rdquo; to be released by Harvard Education Press in March 2020.</p> <p><img class="FloatImageRight" title="On My Own book cover" alt="On My Own book cover" displaymode="Original" src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/on-my-own-book-cover03f4c237c0a569e0ad6dff0000cdac6d.jpg?sfvrsn=0" />Eboni Zamani-Gallaher, a professor of higher education and the executive director of the Council for the Study of Community Colleges, called Wang&rsquo;s book, &ldquo;one of the few texts that granularly captures the nuances of navigating hopes, dreams, and educational aspirations amid segmented opportunities and systemic inequities. It offers a sage call to action to those of us who want to enact transformative change and equitable student outcomes. All told, Wang has written a must-read primer for improving and diversifying STEM pathways.&rdquo;</p> <p>Based on her longitudinal, mixed-methods research that was supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant No. DUE-1430642), the book follows 1,670 two-year college students over four years as they navigated STEM courses and programs in the Midwest. Wang brings to life students&rsquo; educational and life experiences as they traversed the prospect of transfer to a four-year institution.</p> <p>&ldquo;These students were very much on their own to navigate college and the transfer process without sufficient and consistent institutional support,&rdquo; says Wang.</p> <p>In her book, Wang describes how students ended up on one of four different pathways, or momentum trajectories: linear upward, detoured, deferred, or taking a break. These trajectories were shaped by preexisting and lasting disparities in students&rsquo; access to education and financial resources, their experiences with teaching and advising, and reconciling support from and for family.</p> <p>&ldquo;While community colleges hold great promise as a pathway to a bachelor&rsquo;s degree in STEM, the current state of transfer has not yet evolved into a mechanism to alleviate inequities,&rdquo; says Wang.</p> <p>To cultivate a more equitable STEM transfer path, Wang&rsquo;s book points out glaring systemic issues that need revisiting, including redesigning advising structures and fostering advising relationships that ensure students are both seen and heard. Also, college instructors and staff need to critically examine their own behaviors and actions. This means questioning and transforming classroom dynamics and interactions, taking a hard look at institutional data, and engaging in professional development and reflection to truly bring teaching and learning in STEM to the next level.</p> <p>Davis Jenkins, a senior research scholar at the Community College Research Center of Teachers College, Columbia University, commented on how Wang remarkably &ldquo;balances the tension between improving teaching and advising students at the interpersonal level and restructuring programs and services to change the experience for all students. (Wang) shows colleges must and can do both.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;I hope this will be an informative read for researchers, practitioners, and policymakers alike, providing them with concrete and actionable steps toward change,&rdquo; says Wang. &ldquo;These students hold onto their high aspirations, show up every day despite some extraordinary odds and competing responsibilities. It&rsquo;s our turn &mdash; for both transfer sending and transfer receiving institutions, and society writ large &mdash; to level the playing field.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> &bull; Join the&nbsp;<a title="Visit WISCAPE website" href="http://wiscape.wisc.edu/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" data-auth="NotApplicable">Wisconsin Center for the Advancement of Postsecondary Education (WISCAPE)</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://wcernetwork.org">The Network</a> on Tuesday, April 7 for a conversation with Wang to celebrate the launch of "On My Own." The event, which includes lunch, runs from 12 to 1:30 p.m. in the Education Building's Wisconsin Idea Room (room 159).&nbsp;<a href="https://wiscape.wisc.edu/wiscape/events/event-details/2020/04/07/default-calendar/book-launch-for-'on-my-own-the-challenge-and-promise-of-building-equitable-stem-transfer-pathways'" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" data-auth="NotApplicable">Learn more about the book launch event.</a></p>urn:uuid:1df5c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/02/23/walker-s--banana-man--being-performed-at-dance-festival-in-winnipeg Walker's ‘Banana Man’ being performed at Dance Festival in WinnipegChris Walker's "Banana Man" will be performed by Amansu Eason at the Moving Inspirations Dance Festival at the Gas Station Arts Centre in Winnipeg on Feb. 29. n addition, Walker's collaboration with Kevin Ormsby's KasheDance Company, "Facing Home: Love and Redemption," will be presented in Toronto at the Robertson Theatre March 5-6. Sun, 23 Feb 2020 15:48:00 ZChris Walker's "Banana Man" will be performed by Amansu Eason at the Moving Inspirations Dance Festival at the Gas Station Arts Centre in Winnipeg on Feb. 29.<br /> <br /> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/chris-walker8ef3c237c0a569e0ad6dff0000cdac6d.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Chris Walker" displaymode="Original" title="Chris Walker" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Walker </figcaption> </figure> </div> Walker is a professor with the School of Education's <a href="https://dance.wisc.edu/" title="Dance Dept. website" target="_blank">Dance Department</a>.<br /> <br /> The Moving Inspirations Dance Festival is a gathering of dance makers or dancers of African, culturally diverse, and contemporary dance traditions. Walker's is one of 17 choreographic inspirations internationally and across Canada.<br /> <br /> In addition, Walker's collaboration with Kevin Ormsby's KasheDance Company, "Facing Home: Love and Redemption," will be presented in Toronto at the Robertson Theatre March 5-6.<br /> <br /> The body of work is a contemporary dance investigation of the global impact of Bob Marley's music - it's expression of humanity's struggle and inspiration toward love, redemption, and hope and the West Indian paradox that allows for liberation (found in Marley's music) alongside the deep-rooted homophobia in Jamaican/West Indian culture. Since 2015, the project has toured in New York, previously in Toronto and Markham (Canada), Kingston (Jamaica), and Chicago, among others.<br />urn:uuid:fff1c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/02/21/minero-meza-to-receive-outstanding-women-of-color-award-from-uw-madison Minero-Meza to receive Outstanding Women of Color Award from UW-MadisonLaura Minero-Meza, a Ph.D. student with the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology, is a counseling psychology researcher and scholar, therapist, teacher, mentor, public lecturer, and activist. She has partnered in national studies on undocumented youth and the lived experience in the intersection of gender identity, race, citizenship status, and mental health. Fri, 21 Feb 2020 21:49:24 Z<p>Laura Minero-Meza, a Ph.D. student with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/" title="Counseling Psych website" target="_blank">Department of Counseling Psychology</a>, is to receive an Outstanding Women of Color Award from UW-Madison.</p> <p>The 2019-20 Outstanding Women of Color come from varied interests ranging from a Madison City Council member and a computational chemist to an Alzheimer&rsquo;s research advocate and a university chief of staff. They&rsquo;re passionate, innovative, and they&rsquo;re making an impact on their local and national communities.&nbsp;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-connections/laura-minero-meza.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Laura Minero-Meza" displaymode="Original" title="Laura Minero-Meza" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Minero-Meza </figcaption> </figure> </div> Besides her role as a student, Minero-Meza is a counseling psychology researcher and scholar, therapist, teacher, mentor, public lecturer, and activist. She has partnered in national studies on undocumented youth and the lived experience in the intersection of gender identity, race, citizenship status, and mental health.&nbsp;</p> <p>Additionally, Minero-Meza is an advocate for the LGBTQAI+ community and undocumented students like herself at all levels.&nbsp;</p> <p>One colleague describes the way she blends groundbreaking scholarship with personal experience and compassionate activism as "intellectual courage." Minero-Meza has been influential in Madison and beyond as a Wisconsin Network for Peace and Justice collaborator and a person who has used her own story to raise awareness and debunk misconceptions about undocumented immigrants.&nbsp;</p> <p>Minero-Meza co-founded the first UW-Madison student organization for undocumented students and a scholarship to directly support these students, all while working through her own financial challenges. She also created a support group to connect middle school students with mentors to support their Latinx and immigrant identities and collaborates with UW administration on supporting the safety and legal needs of undocumented students on campus.&nbsp;</p> <p>The 12th cohort of Outstanding Women of Color awardees will be honored at a reception on Thursday, March 5 from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the Alumni lounge of the Pyle Center at 716 Langdon Street. The event to celebrate this year&rsquo;s honorees is open to the campus and the community. To register for the event, visit <a href="https://www.talent.wisc.edu/Catalog/Default.aspx?CK=66672" title="RSVP for OWoC event" target="_blank">this website</a>.&nbsp;</p>urn:uuid:61f4c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/02/21/uw-madison-s-burt-to-be-inducted-into-martin-luther-king-jr--collegium-of-scholars UW-Madison’s Burt to be inducted into Martin Luther King Jr. Collegium of ScholarsBrian Burt’s scholarship in the area of diversity, equity, and inclusion is in part an extension of the important efforts King led as a pioneer and advocate in this domain, inspiring generations of people. "I am extremely humbled by this recognition,” says the assistant professor with the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis.Fri, 21 Feb 2020 11:28:00 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Brian Burt is being inducted into the Martin Luther King Jr. Collegium of Scholars during a ceremony on March 26 at the Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel at Morehouse College.</p> <p>Induction into the Martin Luther King Jr. College of Ministers &amp; Laity honors individuals at various career stages and across a wide spectrum of influence who have shown commitment to the adaptive faithful servant-scholar moral cosmopolitan leadership tradition and selfless service to humanity, in tribute to King.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img title="Brian Burt 300 px SQ" displaymode="Original" alt="Brian Burt" src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/brian-burt-300-px-sq.jpg?sfvrsn=0" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption"> Burt </figcaption> </figure> </div> "I am extremely humbled by this recognition,&rdquo; says Burt, an assistant professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, and a research scientist with Wisconsin&rsquo;s Equity and Inclusion Laboratory.</p> <p>Burt&rsquo;s scholarship in the area of diversity, equity, and inclusion is in part an extension of the important efforts King led as a pioneer and advocate in this domain, inspiring generations of people.</p> <p>Having received multiple awards and recognitions, Burt is an accomplished researcher who uses qualitative methodological approaches to study the experience of graduate students and the institutional policies and practices that influence students&rsquo; pathways.</p> <p>His current research falls into two strands: understanding team-based science and exploring the experiences of underrepresented graduate students of color in engineering. Through his research, Burt seeks to provide new ways to understand science participation and the experiences that might promote or turn students away from science pathways.</p> <p>"Dr. Burt&rsquo;s recent recognition into the Martin Luther King Jr. Collegium of Scholars is a testament as to why the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis sought to bring him to UW-Madison,&rdquo; says Jerlando Jackson, the Vilas Distinguished Professor of Higher Education who chairs the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, and leads the Wei LAB. &ldquo;Likewise, his contributions across the university and School of Education, including the Wei LAB over the next several decades, promises to make this a special place to work and learn.&rdquo;</p> <p>The Collegium of Scholars is comprised of academics and scholars who are committed to research, writing, teaching, and mentoring in a wide variety of disciplines and contexts.</p> <p>The theme for this year&rsquo;s induction ceremony, now in its 35th year, is &ldquo;Neighbors First: Co-Creating a Moral Cosmopolitan Culture of Peace.&rdquo;</p> <p>"I hope that my research, writing, teaching, and mentoring continue to live up to the honor that this award&rsquo;s namesake bestows,&rdquo; says Burt.</p>urn:uuid:17f4c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/02/19/nominate-a-colleague-for-the-school-of-education-s-distinguished-achievement-awards Nominate a colleague for the School of Education’s Distinguished Achievement AwardsThe School of Education's outstanding national reputation is due, in large part, to the talent and dedication of its outstanding faculty and staff. To recognize high achievers throughout its community, the Office of Communications and Advancement is now accepting nominations for the 2020 School of Education Faculty & Staff Distinguished Achievement Awards. All nominations are due by Friday, March 13 at 5 p.m.Wed, 19 Feb 2020 11:40:00 Z<p>The School of Education's outstanding national reputation is due, in large part, to the talent and dedication of its outstanding faculty and staff.</p> <p>To recognize high achievers throughout its community, the Office of Communications and Advancement is now accepting nominations for the 2020 School of Education Faculty &amp; Staff Distinguished Achievement Awards.</p> <p>Winners receive a monetary award and will be recognized at a School-wide reception on Thursday, April 30.</p> <p>Following are links to eligibility and submission criteria for each of the awards:</p> <p>&bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://education.wisc.edu/about/faculty-staff-awards/ann-wallace-academic-staff/">Ann Wallace Academic Staff Distinguished Achievement Awards</a></p> <p>&bull; <a href="https://education.wisc.edu/about/faculty-staff-awards/university-staff/">University Staff Distinguished Achievement Awards</a></p> <p>&bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://education.wisc.edu/about/faculty-staff-awards/faculty/">Faculty Distinguished Achievement Awards</a></p> <p>&bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://education.wisc.edu/about/faculty-staff-awards/dick-julie-daly-award/">Dick &amp; Julie Daly Award for Education Student Staff Achievement</a></p> <p>&bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://education.wisc.edu/about/faculty-staff-awards/community-engaged-scholarship/">Award for Community-Engaged Scholarship</a></p> <p>&bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://education.wisc.edu/about/faculty-staff-awards/excellence-in-diversity-award/">Excellence in Diversity Awar</a><a href="http://education.wisc.edu/soe/people/for-faculty-and-staff/faculty-and-staff-awards/diversity">d</a></p> <p>All nominations are due by Friday, March 13 at 5 p.m.</p> <p>For complete details, visit <a href="https://education.wisc.edu/about/faculty-staff-awards/">this awards web page</a>.</p> <p>If you have additional questions, email Events Coordinator Jody Moen at: jody.moen@wisc.edu</p>urn:uuid:2bf4c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/02/19/school-of-education-s-aera-alumni-reception-april-19-in-san-francisco School of Education's AERA Alumni Reception April 19 in San FranciscoThe School of Education will be hosting its annual Alumni Reception during the 2020 American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting in San Francisco. This reception will be held on Sunday, April 19 from 7 to 9 p.m. at the W Hotel San Francisco, located at 181 3rd St.Wed, 19 Feb 2020 10:54:00 Z<p>The School of Education will be hosting its annual Alumni Reception during the 2020 American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting in San Francisco.<br /> <br /> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/aera_2020-e-announce.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="AERA Alumni Reception 2020 graphic" title="AERA_2020 E-Announce" class="FloatImageRight" />This reception will be held on Sunday, April 19 from 7 to 9 p.m. at the W Hotel San Francisco, located at 181 3rd&nbsp;St.</p> <p>The event is free, but registration is required. Register <a href="http://go.wisc.edu/aera2020" target="_blank">here</a>.</p> <p>With any question regarding the alumni reception, please contact Jody Moen at 608-265-7875 or​ email&nbsp;<a href="mailto:jody.moen@wisc.edu">jody.moen@wisc.edu</a>.</p> <p>The 2020 AERA Annual Meeting is taking place in San Francisco from April 17 to 21. The annual meeting is the world&rsquo;s largest gathering of education researchers and a showcase for groundbreaking, innovative studies in an array of areas.</p>urn:uuid:fff2c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/02/18/walker--dance-department-presenting--moonshine--on-feb--28 Walker, Dance Department presenting 'Moonshine' on Feb. 28"Moonshine" is a traditional performance gathering in celebration of Black History Month featuring dance, spoken word, and experimental contemporary performance.Tue, 18 Feb 2020 11:16:00 Z<p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/chris-walker8ef3c237c0a569e0ad6dff0000cdac6d.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Chris Walker" displaymode="Original" title="Chris Walker" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Walker </figcaption> </figure> </div> Throughout February, UW-Madison is celebrating&nbsp; Black History Month via the theme of "Afrofuturism: B(l)ack to the Future."</p> <p>Events are designed to educate, celebrate, and support the imagination of black existence in 2020 and beyond. Events will celebrate black people through the arts, media, and literature across campus. A <a href="https://www.wisc.edu/black-history/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">full schedule of events can be found here.</a></p> <p>One of the events this month will be hosted by the School of Education's Dance Department.&nbsp; On Friday, Feb. 28, at 3:30 p.m. in the H'Doubler Performance Space, Lathrop Hall, Professor Chris Walker will present "Moonshine," a traditional performance gathering in celebration of Black History Month featuring dance, spoken word, and experimental contemporary performance.</p> <p>This event is free and open to the public.</p>urn:uuid:16f3c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/02/17/ruppar-receives--1-4m-grant-to-train-special-education-and-communication-sciences-and-disorders-students-together Ruppar receives $1.4M grant to train special education and communication sciences and disorders students togetherThe School of Education's Andrea Ruppar is the principal investigator for an innovative project that will train UW-Madison students how to work with young people who have complex communication needs.Mon, 17 Feb 2020 20:56:33 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Andrea Ruppar is the principal investigator (PI) on a new $1.4 million grant that will train students at the university how to work with young people who have complex communication needs over the next four years.</p> <p>Ruppar is an associate professor of special education with the School of Education&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a href="https://rpse.education.wisc.edu/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education</a>&nbsp;(RPSE). Kimber Wilkerson, a professor with RPSE and the faculty director of the School&rsquo;s Teacher Education Center, is a co-PI on this project along with Katie Hustad, a UW-Madison professor of communication sciences and disorders.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/andrea-ruppar-250-px-sq.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Ruppar" displaymode="Original" title="Andrea Ruppar 250 px SQ" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Ruppar </figcaption> </figure> </div> The grant, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Education&rsquo;s Office of Special Education Programs, will allow the team to collaborate with local schools to provide practical experiences for 16 UW-Madison students studying communication sciences and disorders, and 16 students studying to become special education teachers.&nbsp;</p> <p>The UW-Madison students will learn about assessment, literacy, and communication instruction for young people who use augmentative and alternative communication in inclusive school settings. The UW-Madison students will gain hands-on experience in the UW Speech and Hearing Clinic, will have shared coursework and school-based practical experiences, and learn state-of-the-art interventions for communication instruction.</p> <p>Ruppar explains how students who have complex communication needs have disabilities that make verbal speech difficult. Examples include autism, apraxia of speech, cerebral palsy, intellectual disability, or multiple disabilities.</p> <p>&ldquo;Students with complex communication needs are more likely to be excluded from everyday school activities,&rdquo; says Ruppar. &ldquo;I am passionate about opening the doors of communication to students who do not speak to communicate, and I am thrilled to be able to collaborate with colleagues in communications sciences and disorders to pass that passion on to future educators. Through this partnership, we will be able to provide specific and intensive training to create a cohort of experts ready to transform education for learners who have always been on the margins of education.&rdquo;</p>urn:uuid:45efc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/02/06/uw-madison-s-hora-collaborates-with-students-to-publish-paper-on--reframing-student-employability UW-Madison’s Hora collaborates with students to publish paper on 'Reframing Student Employability'UW-Madison’s Matt Hora collaborated with students Rena Yehuda Newman, Robert Hemp, Jasmine Brandon, and Yi-Jung Wu to write and publish a paper titled “Reframing student employability: From commodifying the self to supporting the student, worker, and societal well-being.”Thu, 06 Feb 2020 12:19:00 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Matt Hora collaborated with students Rena Yehuda Newman, Robert Hemp, Jasmine Brandon, and Yi-Jung Wu to write and publish a paper titled &ldquo;Reframing student employability: From commodifying the self to supporting the student, worker, and societal well-being.&rdquo;</p> <p>Hora is a research scientist with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.wcer.wisc.edu/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Wisconsin Center for Education Research</a> and the director of the <a href="http://ccwt.wceruw.org/index.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Center for College-Workforce Transitions</a>. Additionally, he is an assistant professor of adult and higher education in the <a href="https://continuingstudies.wisc.edu/liberal-arts-applied-studies/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Department of Liberal Arts and Applied Studies</a>.</p> <p><img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/reframing-student-employability-report.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Reframing Student Employability report" title="Reframing Student Employability report" class="FloatImageRight" />Newman and Hemp are both undergraduate students, while Brandon and Wu are graduate students. Brandon is pursuing a master&rsquo;s degree with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://ci.education.wisc.edu/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Department of Curriculum and Instruction</a>, and Wu is a Ph.D. student in the School&rsquo;s <a href="https://elpa.education.wisc.edu/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis</a>.</p> <p>The paper was published in the <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/vchn20/current">journal Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning</a>. The report&nbsp;centers on two questions: How can colleges and universities cultivate employability in their students? And how can institutions measure and prove their students&rsquo; employability to policymakers and taxpayers?</p> <p>Looking towards countries like Australia and England, the authors examined growing international critiques over simplistic perspectives of employability to address these questions.</p> <p>Over a 16 week course in the <a href="https://eps.education.wisc.edu/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Department of Educational Policy Studies</a>, Hora and his students examined these questions in critiques through reading, discussion, and debate. They reviewed different frameworks of employability around the world, took a historical account of theories underlying different constructs, examined how institutions were applying these ideas, and studied the non-cognitive or soft skills that are common in employability discourse.</p> <p>The authors suggest that current literature on student employability assumes the ability to find employment is dependent on a dedication to acquiring in-demand skills that can be sold in the labor market.</p> <p>&ldquo;In particular, the skills discourse draws on three influential ideas: human capital theory, the ideology of personal responsibilities, and a view of &lsquo;soft&rsquo; skills as commodities with value in the marketplace,&rdquo; the paper explains.</p> <p>However, the accessibility to jobs and the ability to acquire skills is often hindered by factors like hiring discrimination, personal circumstances, and economic trends. The authors also contend that this view of employability privileges the voices and interests of employers over that of students.</p> <p>They recommend that, instead of relying on current employability discourse, colleges and universities invest in instructional infrastructure to enhance students skills, embody fair labors practices, and advocate a vision of higher education that accounts for vocational, social justice, and intellectual goals.</p> <p>The authors write: &ldquo;Given the fact the students are graduating into a world with not only a changing workplace but also one where hiring discrimination persists and racism is normalized by leaders around the world, we argue that fostering critical consciousness in today&rsquo;s college students, and not just a marketable form of &lsquo;cultural tolerance,&rsquo; should be one of the primary goals of our postsecondary institutions.&rdquo;</p> <p>View the full report <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/S2DN3JPN7KTXXQERZIJV/full?target=10.1080/00091383.2020.1693839">here</a>.</p>urn:uuid:e9ecc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/01/30/uw-madison-alum-contreras-named-an--administrator-to-watch--in-2020 UW-Madison alum Contreras named an ‘administrator to watch’ in 2020UW-Madison alumna Sharon Contreras was named one of five "administrators to watch" in 2020 by Education Dive. Contreras received her Ph.D. from the School of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis in 2015.Thu, 30 Jan 2020 10:41:00 Z<p>UW-Madison alumna Sharon Contreras was named one of five "administrators to watch" in 2020 by Education Dive.&nbsp;</p> <p>Contreras received her Ph.D. from the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://elpa.education.wisc.edu/" title="ELPA website" target="_blank">Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis</a> in 2015.&nbsp;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/contreras-250-px-sq.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Contreras" displaymode="Original" title="Contreras 250 px SQ" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Contreras </figcaption> </figure> </div> She has served as the superintendent of the Guilford County Schools since 2016. Contreras is the first woman and the first Latina to lead North Carolina&rsquo;s third largest district.</p> <p>After having her contract extended to 2022, Contreras is proposing a $2 billion facilities plan that includes renovation, rebuilding, closing, and consolidating of schools. According to Education Dive, she has stated that none of the district&rsquo;s schools would be &ldquo;left untouched.&rdquo;</p> <p>While her proposal is still in its initial stages, Contreras&rsquo; hard work is paying off in other areas. Under her leadership, the district has seen increases in state test scores in every subject at every grade level.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;The improvement suggests that the strategic investments our Board of Education has made in curriculum development, instructional materials and supplies, and ongoing professional development for our educators are paying dividends in the classroom for all students,&rdquo; Contreras tells Education Dive. &nbsp;</p> <p>Read Education Dive&rsquo;s article <a href="https://www.educationdive.com/news/5-administrators-to-watch-in-2020/569703/ " title="Education Dive article" target="_blank">here</a>.&nbsp;</p>urn:uuid:7decc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/01/29/uw-madison-s-lee--bartlett-named-incoming-editors-of-anthropology-and-education-quarterly UW-Madison’s Lee, Bartlett named incoming editors of Anthropology and Education QuarterlyUW-Madison’s Stacey Lee and Lesley Bartlett were recently named incoming editors for Anthropology and Education Quarterly (AEQ), a journal of the American Anthropological Association.Wed, 29 Jan 2020 22:45:29 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Stacey Lee and Lesley Bartlett were recently named incoming editors for Anthropology and Education Quarterly (AEQ), a journal of the American Anthropological Association.&nbsp;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/stacey-lee-and-lesley-bartlet.png?sfvrsn=0" alt="Stacey Lee and Lesley Bartlett" displaymode="Original" title="Stacey Lee and Lesley Bartlet" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Stacey Lee and Lesley Bartlett </figcaption> </figure> </div> Bartlett and Lee are both professors with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://eps.education.wisc.edu/" title="EPS website" target="_blank">Department of Educational Policy Studies</a>. Diana Rodriguez Gomez, an assistant professor with the Department, was named an associate editor of AEQ.</p> <p>AEQ is the journal of the Council on Anthropology and Education, which is a subdivision of the American Anthropological Association. It publishes ethnographic research that engages social theory while examining education, which includes schooling and socialization in family and broader communities.&nbsp;</p> <p>Learn more about AEQ <a href=" https://anthrosource.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/15481492" title="AEQ info" target="_blank">here</a>.&nbsp;</p>urn:uuid:85ecc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/01/29/li-chiao-ping-dance-presenting--dancing-the-chazen Li Chiao-Ping Dance presenting 'Dancing the Chazen'Li-Chiao-Ping Dance (LCPD) is ​presenting "Dancing the Chazen," the fourth and fifth events in the 2019-20 series "7DaysDancing." "7DaysDancing" is a seven-part program of free, live art experiences aiming to activate community spaces in new, inventive, and inviting ways. This series features site-specific works utilizing the UW-Madison’s Chazen Museum of Art, meant to guide the audience through the museum while articulating the properties of spaces through the collaboration of bodies in place and motion.Wed, 29 Jan 2020 22:27:15 Z<p>Li-Chiao-Ping Dance (LCPD) is presenting "Dancing the Chazen," the fourth and fifth events in the 2019-20 series "7DaysDancing."</p> <p>"7DaysDancing" is a seven-part program of free, live art experiences aiming to activate community spaces in new, inventive, and inviting ways.&nbsp;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/li-chiao-pingd111bf37c0a569e0ad6dff0000cdac6d.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Li Chiao-Ping" displaymode="Original" title="Li Chiao-Ping" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Li Chiao-Ping </figcaption> </figure> </div> This series features site-specific works utilizing the UW-Madison&rsquo;s Chazen Museum of Art, meant to guide the audience through the museum while articulating the properties of spaces through the collaboration of bodies in place and motion.&nbsp;</p> <p>"Dancing the Chazen" presents a traveling program of solos, duets, and group works choreographed and directed by Li Chiao-Ping, a professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://dance.wisc.edu/" title="Dance website" target="_blank">Dance Department</a>, in collaboration with the dancers. Performances will also feature guests like artist Se&aacute;n Curran, musician Julia McConahay, writer Jerri Hurlbutt, and artist Aristotle Georgiades.&nbsp;</p> <p>"Dancing the Chazen" is on Friday, Jan. 31 from 6:30 to 7:15 p.m. and on Saturday, Feb. 1 from 6 to 7:15 p.m. The events are free and open to the public. Immediately following the Saturday performance, LCPD will host a reception and talk-back in the Chazen.</p>urn:uuid:3feec237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/01/29/wisconsin-state-journal-spotlights-li-chiao-ping-dance Wisconsin State Journal spotlights Li Chiao-Ping DanceUW-Madison’s Li Chiao-Ping and her dance company, Li-Chiao Ping Dance (LCPD), were recently featured in the Wisconsin State Journal. Li is a Vilas Research Professor with the School of Education’s Dance Department and is the founder of the LCPD. “Dancing the Chazen” is free and open to the public. LCPD will perform excerpts from “Dancing” on Friday, Jan. 31 at 6:30 p.m. The complete performance will start at 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 1 and will be followed by a reception and talk-back in the Chazen lobby. Wed, 29 Jan 2020 21:37:07 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Li Chiao-Ping and her dance company, Li-Chiao Ping Dance (LCPD), were recently featured in the Wisconsin State Journal.</p> <p>Li is a Vilas Research Professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="http://dance.wisc.edu" title="Dance Dept. website" target="_blank">Dance Department</a> and is the founder of the LCPD.&nbsp;</p> <p>While UW-Madison&rsquo;s <a href="http://chazen.wisc.edu" title="Chazen website" target="_blank">Chazen Museum of Art</a> has always showcased art from faculty, its 50th anniversary celebration is drawing art and performance from faculty across the entire university to reflect the evolution of disciplinary art. &nbsp;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/li-chiao-pingd111bf37c0a569e0ad6dff0000cdac6d.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Li Chiao-Ping" displaymode="Original" title="Li Chiao-Ping" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Li Chiao-Ping </figcaption> </figure> </div> Li, who has been performing modern dance in Madison for over 25 years, will be dancing with her company throughout the museum&rsquo;s galleries.&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s not always been a sense of welcome into that kind of space,&rdquo; Li tells the State Journal. &ldquo;So I was really excited that culture is changing.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> She explained that those same changes are happening at museums around the world, like the Tate Modern in London and New York&rsquo;s Museum of Modern Art.&nbsp;</p> <p>The 70-minute performance, titled &ldquo;Dancing the Chazen,&rdquo; will include solo, duet, and ensemble pieces, choreographed and directed by Li.&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s an important statement that dance is seen as a contemporary art form next to the other fine arts &mdash; that we&rsquo;re being represented,&rdquo; She said.&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;Dancing the Chazen&rdquo; is free and open to the public. LCPD will perform excerpts from &ldquo;Dancing&rdquo; on Friday, Jan. 31 at 6:30 p.m. The complete performance will start at 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 1 and will be followed by a reception and talk-back in the Chazen lobby.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Read more about the event <a href="https://madison.com/entertainment/arts-and-theatre/the-chazen-museum-of-art-at-growing-changing-and-celebrating/article_de1b114b-ceda-5f40-9176-3a3b9640c614.html " title="Madison.com article" target="_blank">via this Madison.com web page</a>.&nbsp;</p>urn:uuid:e1ecc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/01/28/dance-department-presents-2020-faculty-concert-feb.-6-8-and-13-15 Dance Department presents 2020 faculty concert Feb. 6-8 and 13-15The School of Education’s Dance Department is hosting its annual faculty concert Feb. 6-8 and Feb. 13-15 at the Margaret H’Doubler Performance Space, Lathrop Hall. The concert will feature the work of guest artist Seán Curran, who makes dance “with the sharp intelligence of a conceptualist (Boston Globe)" that is the “equivalent of a night of invigorating conversations (New York Times),” and contemporary dance works from UW-Madison faculty artists Duane Lee Holland, Li Chiao-Ping, Marlene Skog, Chris Walker, and Jin-Wen Yu. Tue, 28 Jan 2020 20:24:32 Z<p>The School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="http://dance.wisc.edu" title="Dance Dept. home page" target="_blank">Dance Department</a> is hosting its annual faculty concert Feb. 6-8 and 13-15 at the Margaret H&rsquo;Doubler Performance Space, Lathrop Hall.&nbsp;</p> <p>The concert will feature the work of guest artist Se&aacute;n Curran, who makes dance &ldquo;with the sharp intelligence of a conceptualist (Boston Globe)" that is the &ldquo;equivalent of a night of invigorating conversations (New York Times),&rdquo; and contemporary dance works from UW-Madison faculty artists Duane Lee Holland, Li Chiao-Ping, Marlene Skog, Chris Walker, and Jin-Wen Yu.&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/facultyconcert2020mailcampaignimage.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Faculty Concert poster" title="facultyconcert2020mailcampaignimage" class="FloatImageRight" />Curran will present excerpts from his pieces &ldquo;Social Discourse,&rdquo; an abstract work with robust athletic partnering. Assistant professor Holland will premiere &ldquo;Heartbreak Hotel,&rdquo; a work that investigates empowerment through self-love, and Skog, also an assistant professor, will expand her Shakespearean exploration with a solo performance that reinvents the character Puck from "A Midsummer Night&rsquo;s Dream."<br /> <br /> Li&nbsp;will premiere &ldquo;dirt,&rdquo; which casts 14 dancers as microorganisms in a whimsical free-form fantasy, while Yu will present a sensual, dynamic ensemble piece exploring non-verbal expression, titled &ldquo;Said and Done.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>Tickets are $22, $16 for students/seniors, and are available for purchase <a href="http://dance.wisc.edu/Feeds/artsticketing.wisc.edu" title="Purchase tickets online" target="_blank">online</a>, by phone at 608-265-2787, and in person at 800 Langdon St., Madison.</p>urn:uuid:15e7c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/01/23/op-ed-from-uw-madison-s-jackson-discusses-challenges-faced-by-chief-diversity-officers Op-ed from UW-Madison’s Jackson discusses challenges faced by chief diversity officersAn op-ed from UW-Madison’s Jerlando Jackson, published by Cuma Management, discusses the recent influx of chief diversity officer (CDO) positions, and the challenges they face. Jackson is the Vilas Distinguished Professor of Higher Education and the chair of the School of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. While CDO positions are becoming more common at big companies, few are given the resources and support necessary to be successful, writes Jackson. Thu, 23 Jan 2020 11:34:00 Z<p>An op-ed from UW-Madison&rsquo;s Jerlando Jackson, published by Cuma Management, discusses the recent influx of chief diversity officer (CDO) positions, and the challenges they face.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img title="Jerlando Jackson 250 px SQ" displaymode="Original" alt="Jerlando Jackson" src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/jerlando-jackson-250-px-sq.jpg?sfvrsn=0" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Jackson </figcaption> </figure> </div> Jackson is the Vilas Distinguished Professor of Higher Education and the chair of the School of Education&rsquo;s <a target="_blank" title="ELPA website" href="https://elpa.education.wisc.edu/">Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis</a>. He is also the director and chief research scientist of <a target="_blank" title="Wei LAB website" href="https://projects.wcer.wisc.edu/weilab">Wisconsin&rsquo;s Equity and Inclusion Laboratory</a> within the <a target="_blank" title="WCER website" href="http://wcer.wisc.edu">Wisconsin Center for Education Research</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>While CDO positions are becoming more common at big companies, few are given the resources and support necessary to be successful, writes Jackson who&nbsp;highlights four challenges that need to be addressed as companies reconsider infrastructure to support diversity and inclusion.</p> <p>These challenges include the newness of the position, the low business priority of diversity, unrealistic responsibilities, and insufficient data collection. Jackson explains that this suggests &ldquo;more effort is needed to position CDOs for success.&rdquo;</p> <p>He recommends that businesses make diversity and inclusion a key business priority, as well as empower CDOs with the authority and resources to implement comprehensive and successful strategies.&nbsp;</p> <p>Read <a target="_blank" title="Jackson op-ed" href="https://www.cumanagement.com/articles/2020/01/diversity-insight-set-fail">Jackson's op-ed here</a>.</p>urn:uuid:05e7c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/01/22/elected-to-educate--baruah-fights-for-accessible-and-equitable-public-education Elected to educate: Baruah fights for accessible and equitable public education UW–Madison’s Samantha Baruah, the associate director of the School of Education’s Teacher Education Center, has been working for the past 11 years to make education more accessible and equitable on a local and national scale.Wed, 22 Jan 2020 11:34:00 Z<p>UW&ndash;Madison&rsquo;s Samantha Baruah, the associate director of the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://tec.education.wisc.edu/" title="TEC website" target="_blank">Teacher Education Center</a>, has been working for the past 11 years to make education more accessible and equitable on a local and national scale.</p> <p>Born in Vietnam, Baruah and her mother immigrated to the United States in 1980 as political refugees. She was two years old and grew up in a low-income household in Iowa. From a young age, she understood how that could affect a person&rsquo;s education.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/samantha-baruah-250-px-sq.png?sfvrsn=0" alt="Samantha Baruah" displaymode="Original" title="Samantha-Baruah 250 px SQ" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption"> Baruah </figcaption> </figure> </div> &ldquo;In my K&ndash;12 experience, I was that child who was on free and reduced lunch and Reading Recovery,&rdquo; Baruah says. &ldquo;When I was on free and reduced lunch, we had different color lunch tickets. So everybody knew who the poor kids were. There are certain stigmas associated with that.&rdquo;</p> <p>Baruah grew up believing she had to fit an imagined convention of what an Asian person could be, and so she thought she wanted to be a scientist.</p> <p>&ldquo;It was falling into that trap of the stereotype of an Asian person being good at math,&rdquo; she says. &ldquo;I thought that was the path I was supposed to go on.&rdquo;</p> <p>After receiving her bachelor&rsquo;s degree in biology from the University of Iowa, Baruah had a conversation with a friend that convinced her to run for a seat on the school board.</p> <p>&ldquo;I was actually on my way to a Steve Miller Band concert with some friends, and a friend of mine said that there were three seats open on the school board and that only one person had turned in their paperwork,&rdquo; Baruah says. &ldquo;She said, &lsquo;You really care about education, and you complain a lot about education. How about you actually do something about it?&rsquo; And so I did. I got the paperwork, got the required number of signatures, and turned in my application.&rdquo;</p> <p>Despite the initial lack of candidates, she had to run a real campaign.</p> <p>&ldquo;It turned out that it was actually going to be a competitive race,&rdquo; she recalls. &ldquo;I thought it was going to be really easy. If I remember correctly, I think there were 11 people. At some point, people dropped out after they had declared, but there were just three seats open, so I knew I was going to have to work for it now. But it was a great experience. It really made me solidify why I think education is such an important aspect of everybody&rsquo;s life.&rdquo;</p> <p>Baruah served on the school board from 2008 until 2015, and she realized that education was what got her out of poverty.</p> <p>&ldquo;Education has allowed me to have certain privileges,&rdquo; she says. &ldquo;For me, it&rsquo;s very important that we invest in education, particularly for children of marginalized populations, because we know that the investment in education and in kids will pay dividends down the road. Whether that is higher earning power, lower incarceration rates, [or] just purely on the academic side of self-enlightenment and academic achievement and self-worth. Education has this opportunity to open so many doors for people.&rdquo;</p> <p>Baruah believes her experiences prepared her for her role at the Teacher Education Center.</p> <p>&ldquo;(My school board experience) gave me a greater appreciation for different perspectives. It gave me an appreciation for the need for intentionality of process and purpose,&rdquo; she says. &ldquo;Being intentional on naming what you&rsquo;re doing so that there&rsquo;s no question or interpretation as to what your purpose is &mdash; that&rsquo;s one of the things that I learned being a school board member. I believe humor is also important when trying to work in a system for the betterment of kids.&rdquo;</p> <p>As for the Teacher Education Center, Baruah is excited to help create future teachers.</p> <p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;ve been working with all of our teacher preparation programs to bring them together and think about cross-programmatic initiatives,&rdquo; she says. &ldquo;There are such great initiatives that individual programs are developing, and what the Teacher Education Center can do is help grow those (programs) so that they are applicable to all of our programs. It&rsquo;s taking that community model and not only teaching our students about it, but also trying to live it as well.&rdquo;</p>urn:uuid:0de7c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/01/21/uw-madison-s-nachman-to-be-honored-with-cross-future-leaders-award UW-Madison’s Nachman to be honored with Cross Future Leaders AwardUW–Madison’s Brett Ranon Nachman is one of seven students from across the country to be honored with a K. Patricia Cross Future Leaders Award from the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U). Nachman is a Ph.D. student with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. Nachman’s research concentrates on the depictions and experiences of autistic college students, particularly in community college settings. His core research interest stems from his own identity as an autistic community-college graduate. Tue, 21 Jan 2020 11:31:00 Z<p>UW&ndash;Madison&rsquo;s Brett Ranon Nachman is one of seven students from across the country to be honored with a K. Patricia Cross Future Leaders Award from the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&amp;U).</p> <p>Nachman is a Ph.D. student with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a target="_blank" title="ELPA website" href="https://elpa.education.wisc.edu/">Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis</a>.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img title="Nachman 250 px SQ" displaymode="Original" alt="Brett Nachman" src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/nachman-250-px-sq.jpg?sfvrsn=0" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Nachman </figcaption> </figure> </div> The 2020 recipients were chosen in a rigorous process from a pool of more than 200 nominees from 118 institutions who have demonstrated the potential for leadership in teaching and learning and a strong commitment to academic and civic responsibility. The Cross Award is open to all doctoral-level graduate students who are planning a career in higher education, regardless of academic department, and have been nominated by a faculty member or administrator.</p> <p>Nachman&rsquo;s research concentrates on the depictions and experiences of autistic college students, particularly in community college settings. His core research interest stems from his own identity as an autistic community-college graduate.&nbsp;</p> <p>Nachman&rsquo;s work also centers on LGBTQ campus climate issues, inclusive teaching practices, and community college STEM transfer students' experiences. His research scholarship prioritizes several factors, including: acting with&nbsp;transparency and thoughtfulness in discussing identity management issues; presenting findings that drive change in how campuses provide more student-centered learning; and elevating the perspectives of underrepresented student populations.</p> <p>Nachman&rsquo;s work&nbsp;has been published in&nbsp;outlets including&nbsp;the Community College Journal of Research and Practice,&nbsp;Teachers College Record, and Frontiers in Psychology.</p> <p>Since 2017, Nachman has served as a graduate student researcher with College Autism Network (CAN), which addresses advocacy, research, and training related to autism in postsecondary education. As part of CAN, he has helped spearhead programming for the annual College Inclusion Summit, which gathers administrators, disability specialists, researchers, educators, students, and autistic self-advocates to discuss ways to best support and involve autistic college students in creating welcoming postsecondary education experiences.&nbsp;</p> <p>Nachman launched and facilitates the College Autism Network Virtual Association of Scholars (CANVAS), which features a list-serv, monthly online meetings with guest presentations, and resources. Under Brett's leadership, CANVAS has cultivated a community of more than 250 members from all around the world to share tools and insights. He and his colleagues have also developed an online list of college-based autism programs that serve students in their transitions into and through postsecondary education.</p> <p>Outside of his research, Nachman places effort in forming new skillsets as an educator, whether in teaching courses across numerous&nbsp;levels and platforms, presenting workshops through the Delta professional development program, and offering guest lectures about his autism/higher education work across different spaces at UW-Madison. A common thread that ties Nachman&rsquo;s teaching is his commitment in having students collaborate on learning outcomes, follow their passions and skillsets in developing meaningful projects, and create inclusive spaces through forming classroom guidelines. Nachman also prioritizes offering detailed formative feedback to students, and seeks the same in return in his own development as an emergent educator.&nbsp;In addition to teaching, he has served as the Graduate Student Representative on the National Board of Directors for The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi since 2018. Over his undergraduate and graduate school years, Nachman has led seven student organizations and mentored students in various capacities (e.g., orienting incoming and prospective students to campus, reviewing college applications, helping students plan campus events). Brett serves as a reviewer for multiple peer-reviewed education journals and academic conferences.</p> <p>Nachaman adheres to several principles as a scholar, educator, and leader. First, help colleagues in leveraging their strengths to be their best. Second, view each moment as a chance&nbsp;for self-growth. Third, make every space as equitable as possible based on individuals' varying identities, experiences, and learning preferences. Fourth, take initiative by&nbsp;creating opportunities for positive change, instead of waiting for change to arrive. Finally, pay it forward.</p> <p>&ldquo;We are truly grateful to Pat Cross for her deep and abiding commitment to championing the next generation of leaders in higher education. This year&rsquo;s scholars have demonstrated excellence in teaching, scholarship, leadership, and civic engagement. We are thrilled to honor them and look forward to the many ways in which they will shape the future of American higher education,&rdquo; said AAC&amp;U President Lynn Pasquerella.</p> <p>The 2020 Cross Scholars will be recognized at&nbsp;AACU&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a href="https://www.aacu.org/AM20">2020 Annual Meeting</a>, &ldquo;Shaping the Future of Higher Education: An Invitation to Lead,&rdquo; in Washington, DC, January 22&ndash;25. They will be honored and introduced to the AAC&amp;U community during the Opening Plenary and will speak in the session &ldquo;Voices of Changemakers: How Commitments to Learning, Community, and Equity Shape Future Faculty.&rdquo; The Cross Award recipients will also participate in other sessions and meetings throughout the conference.</p> <p>For more information about AACU, its annual meeting, or the K. Patricia Cross Future Leaders Award, visit&nbsp;<a href="https://www.aacu.org/">www.aacu.org</a>.</p> To learn more about all of this year's award winners, check out <a target="_blank" title="AACU press release" href="https://www.aacu.org/press/press-releases/seven-graduate-students-honored-2020-k-patricia-cross-future-leaders-award">this AACU news release</a>.&nbsp;urn:uuid:31eac237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/01/20/badger-volunteers-registration-opens-jan--24 Badger Volunteers registration opens Jan. 24On Friday, Jan. 24, registration for Badger Volunteers will be open to all UW-Madison students. Badger Volunteers is a semester-long program that pairs teams of students with community organizations (schools, nonprofits, municipalities) to volunteer one to four hours each week at the same organization. The program is designed to foster meaningful and consistent connections between community partners and students over the course of an entire semester. Volunteer opportunities fall into three categories: education; sustainability; and public health.Mon, 20 Jan 2020 11:30:00 Z<p>On Friday, Jan. 24, registration for&nbsp;<a href="https://morgridge.wisc.edu/students/badger-volunteers/" target="_blank" data-auth="NotApplicable">Badger Volunteers</a>&nbsp;will be open to all UW-Madison students.</p> <p>Badger Volunteers is a semester-long program that pairs teams of students with community organizations (schools, nonprofits, municipalities) to volunteer one to four hours each week at the same organization. </p> <p>The program is designed to foster meaningful and consistent connections between community partners and students over the course of an entire semester.&nbsp;Volunteer opportunities fall into three categories: education; sustainability; and public health.</p> <p>Badger Volunteers has an opportunity for anyone with any major and interest.</p> <p>&nbsp;Badger Volunteers registration will open at 7 a.m. on Friday, Jan.24, and close on Friday, Jan. 31 at 11:59 p.m. </p> <p>Students can only register online at&nbsp;<a href="http://go.wisc.edu/bv" target="_blank" data-auth="NotApplicable" title="Visit the Badger Volunteers website">go.wisc.edu/bv</a></p> <p>Badger Volunteers is run through the Morgridge Center for Public Service, which is administratively housed within the School of Education.<br /> <br /> <a href="http://go.wisc.edu/bv" title="Visit the Badger Volunteers website" target="_blank"><img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/choose-from-80-opportunities.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Badger Volunteers" title="Choose from 80+ Opportunities" class="FloatImageLeft" /></a></p>urn:uuid:ffe2c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/01/17/popular-science-features-expertise-of-uw-madison-s-enright-on-psychology-of-forgiveness Popular Science features expertise of UW-Madison’s Enright on psychology of forgivenessPopular Science magazine recently featured the expertise of UW-Madison’s Robert Enright in an article on forgiveness. Enright, a professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Psychology, has been researching how forgiveness affects wellbeing at locations across the globe for more than three decades. Fri, 17 Jan 2020 11:23:00 Z<p>Popular Science magazine recently featured the expertise of UW-Madison&rsquo;s Robert Enright in an article on forgiveness.</p> <p>Enright, a professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://edpsych.education.wisc.edu/" title="Ed Psych website" target="_blank">Department of Educational Psychology</a>, has been researching how forgiveness affects wellbeing at locations across the globe for more than three decades.&nbsp;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/bob-enright-350-px.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Robert Enright" displaymode="Original" title="Bob Enright-350 px" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Robert Enright </figcaption> </figure> </div> According to Popular Science, expanding research on the topic suggests that living with anger can be harmful to both mental and physical health. However, forgiving someone can be more complicated than it sounds.</p> <p>Many are concerned that forgiving someone is about the other person and might mean letting an abuser back into their lives, or showing kindness to someone that doesn&rsquo;t necessarily deserve it. Enright and other forgiveness scholars, though, consider forgiveness to be a conscious decision that is completely internal.&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;Most people have used the word forgiveness all their lives,&rdquo; Enright tells Popular Science. &ldquo;We have these really harmful colloquial ideas about what forgiveness is.&rdquo;</p> <p>Enright goes on to explain that the key is to separate ideas of reconciliation and forgiveness. While reconciliation is a negotiation process meant to save or preserve something, forgiveness is a virtue that guides actions and is meant to provide relief.</p> <p>Noting that forgiveness is a choice for people who have been deeply hurt by another, Enright has constructed a framework for teaching people how to forgive and developed it into a 20-step program. The program is divided into four phases: uncovering your anger, deciding to forgive, working on forgiveness, and discovery and release from emotional pain.</p> <p>The first step towards forgiveness is deciding not to harm the person who hurt you, but it&rsquo;s not about &lsquo;hugging it out,&rsquo; like colloquial ideas would suggest. It&rsquo;s about letting go of a desire to hurt or demean that person somehow. &ldquo;In the face of being harmed,&rdquo; Enright says, &ldquo;You&rsquo;re choosing to do the opposite.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> Read the Popular Science article <a href="https://www.popsci.com/story/health/forgive-psychology-trauma/" title="Popular Science article" target="_blank">here</a>.</p>urn:uuid:72e5c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2020/01/16/uw-madison-s-louie-receiving-early-career-publication-award--from-aera-sig UW-Madison’s Louie receiving Early Career Publication Award from AERA SIGUW-Madison’s Nicole Louie is receiving the Early Career Publication Award from the American Educational Research Association’s (AERA) Research in Mathematics Education Special Interest Group (SIG). Louie, an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Curriculum and Instruction, is being honored for her 2018 paper, “Culture and ideology in mathematics teacher noticing,” published in the journal Educational Studies in Mathematics.Thu, 16 Jan 2020 21:31:45 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Nicole Louie is receiving the Early Career Publication Award from the American Educational Research Association&rsquo;s (AERA) Research in Mathematics Education Special Interest Group (SIG).</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/nicole-louie-250-px-fb-square.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Nicole Louie" displaymode="Original" title="Nicole Louie 250 px FB square" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Louie </figcaption> </figure> </div> Louie, an assistant professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://ci.education.wisc.edu/" title="CI website" target="_blank">Department of Curriculum and Instruction</a>, is being honored for her 2018 paper, &ldquo;Culture and ideology in mathematics teacher noticing,&rdquo; published in the journal Educational Studies in Mathematics.</p> <p>Louie will be honored during the SIG&rsquo;s business meeting that takes place during AERA&rsquo;s 2020 Annual Meeting in San Francisco April 17-21.&nbsp;</p> <p>Her paper, which responds to literature on mathematics teacher noticing, argues that it&rsquo;s positioning misses the cultural and ideological dimensions of what and how teachers notice. In one case identified, Louie examines the way one algebra teacher acknowledges and responds to the mathematical strengths of students from marginalized groups.</p> Read Louie's paper <a href="https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ1166000" title="Louie's paper" target="_blank">here</a>.